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Bring Up The Bodies : 2012 Man Booker Prize Winning sequel to Wolf Hall - Hilary Mantel

Bring Up The Bodies

2012 Man Booker Prize Winning sequel to Wolf Hall

Paperback

Published: 10th May 2012
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Winner of the Man Booker Prize 2012

Book Description

The sequel to the Man Booker-winning Wolf Hall.

My boy Thomas, give him a dirty look and he'll gouge your eye out. Trip him, and he'll cut off your leg,' says Walter Cromwell in the year 1500. 'But if you don't cut across him he's a very gentleman. And he'll stand anyone a drink.

By 1535 Thomas Cromwell, the blacksmith's son, is far from his humble origins. Chief Minister to Henry VIII, his fortunes have risen with those of Anne Boleyn, Henry's second wife, for whose sake Henry has broken with Rome and created his own church. But Henry's actions have forced England into dangerous isolation, and Anne has failed to do what she promised: bear a son to secure the Tudor line. When Henry visits Wolf Hall, Cromwell watches as Henry falls in love with the silent, plain Jane Seymour. The minister sees what is at stake: not just the king's pleasure, but the safety of the nation. As he eases a way through the sexual politics of the court, its miasma of gossip, he must negotiate a 'truth' that will satisfy Henry and secure his own career. But neither minister nor king will emerge undamaged from the bloody theatre of Anne's final days.

In Bring up the Bodies, sequel to the Man Booker Prize-winning Wolf Hall, Hilary Mantel explores one of the most mystifying and frightening episodes in English history: the destruction of Anne Boleyn. This new novel is a speaking picture, an audacious vision of Tudor England that sheds its light on the modern world. It is the work of one of our great writers at the height of her powers.

About the Author

Hilary Mantel is one of our most important living writers. She is the author of twelve books, including A Place of Greater Safety, Giving Up the Ghost, Beyond Black, which was shortlisted for the 2006 Orange Prize, and Wolf Hall, which won the 2009 Man Booker Prize.

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
Bring Up The Bodies
 
4.6

(based on 5 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (3)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

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    (0)

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    (0)

100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Captures time and place (5)
  • Interesting characters (5)
  • Well written (5)
  • Educational (4)
  • Easy to understand (3)

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Older readers (5)
    • Younger readers (3)
      • Reviewer Profile:
      • Bookworm (4)

    Reviewed by 5 customers

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    Displaying reviews 1-5

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    5.0

    Lawyer's claim for a National church

    By Maggie

    from Sydney Au

    About Me Everyday Reader

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Captures Time And Place
    • Easy To Understand
    • Educational
    • Educative
    • Great For Anyone
    • Interesting Characters
    • Lawyers Approach
    • Original Story
    • Well Written

    Cons

    • Limited Appeal

    Best Uses

    • History And Theological S
    • Older Readers
    • Special Needs
    • Younger Readers

    Comments about Bring Up The Bodies:

    Service and delivery are very satisfactory.
    thank you

    Comment on this review

     
    4.0

    A ManBooker favourite

    By Tafer

    from Sydney

    About Me Bookworm

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Captures Time And Place
    • Educational
    • Interesting Characters
    • Well Written

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Gift
      • Older Readers
      • Travel Reading
      • Younger Readers

      Comments about Bring Up The Bodies:

      This follow up to Wolf Hall is a page turner from start to finish. The language is polished, characters well developed and the dangers and rewards of life in Tudor England enthralling.

      Comment on this review

       
      5.0

      A highly successful sequel to Wolf Hall

      By Anonymouse

      from Melbourne

      About Me Bookworm

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • A must for history lovers
      • Captures Time And Place
      • Easy To Understand
      • Educational
      • Interesting Characters
      • Well Written

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • A new look at old facts
        • Older Readers
        • Reference

        Comments about Bring Up The Bodies:

        I read for pleasure and information.
        Finding and buying books on line is so easy
        Booktopia is a dependable and reliable source of the kind of books I want.

        Comment on this review

         
        4.0

        Read Fiction - Learn History

        By The Lady Reader

        from Melbourne

        About Me Bookworm

        Verified Buyer

        Pros

        • Captures Time And Place
        • Difficult to put down
        • Easy To Understand
        • Educational
        • Great For Anyone
        • Interesting Characters
        • Well Written

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Enjoy and want more
          • Gift
          • Older Readers
          • Travel Reading
          • Younger Readers

          Comments about Bring Up The Bodies:

          If you have read "Wolf Hall" you will not be able to wait to read "Bring Up The Bodies"

          Comment on this review

           
          5.0

          Keeping friends close and enemies closer

          By Margaret Menzies

          from Melbourne, Vic, AU

          About Me Bookworm

          Verified Buyer

          Pros

          • Captures Time And Place
          • Interesting Characters
          • Makes history come alive
          • Well Written

          Cons

            Best Uses

            • Historical fiction buffs
            • Older Readers

            Comments about Bring Up The Bodies:

            A brilliantly evocative depiction of the bloody years of Henry VIII and his unfortunate wives.
            Picking up from where we left off in "Wolf Hall", Cromwell twists and turns with the prevailing winds of Henry's moods.
            As Henry disposes of one wife so that he can marry the one waiting in the wings, Cromwell walks the thin line between triumph and disaster.

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            'This is a bloody story about the death of Anne Boleyn, but Hilary Mantel is a writer who thinks through the blood. She uses her power of prose to create moral ambiguity and the real uncertainty of political life...She has recast the most essential period of our modern English history; we have the greatest modern English prose writer reviving possibly one of the best known pieces of English history' Sir Peter Stothard, Chair of the judges for the Man Booker Prize 2012 'BRING UP THE BODIES is simply exceptional...I envy anyone who hasn't yet read it' Sandra Parsons, Daily Mail 'In another league. This ongoing story of Henry VIII's right-hand man is the finest piece of historical fiction I have ever read. A staggering achievement' Sarah Crompton, Sunday Telegraph 'BRING UP THE BODIES succeeds brilliantly in every particle...it's an imaginative achievement to exhaust superlatives' Spectator 'WOLF HALL was a tour de force, but its sequel is leaner, more brilliant, more shocking than its predecessor' Erica Wagner, The Times

            Hilary Mantel

            A Man Booker Prize Winner

            Hilary Mantel was born in Glossop, Derbyshire, England on 6 July 1952. She studied Law at the London School of Economics and Sheffield University. She was employed as a social worker, and lived in Botswana for five years, followed by four years in Saudi Arabia, before returning to Britain in the mid-1980s. In 1987 she was awarded the Shiva Naipaul Memorial Prize for an article about Jeddah, and she was film critic for The Spectator from 1987 to 1991.

            Her novels include Eight Months on Ghazzah Street (1988), set in Jeddah; Fludd (1989), set in a mill village in the north of England and winner of the Winifred Holtby Memorial Prize, the Cheltenham Prize and the Southern Arts Literature Prize; A Place of Greater Safety (1992), an epic account of the events of the French revolution that won the Sunday Express Book of the Year award; A Change of Climate (1994), the story of a missionary couple whose lives are torn apart by the loss of their child; and An Experiment in Love (1995), about the events in the lives of three schoolfriends from the north of England who arrive at London University in 1970, winner of the 1996 Hawthornden Prize.

            Her recent novel The Giant, O'Brien (1998) tells the story of Charles O'Brien who leaves his home in Ireland to make his fortune as a sideshow attraction in London. Her latest books are Giving Up the Ghost: A Memoir (2003), an autobiography in fiction and non-fiction, taking the reader from early childhood through to the discoveries in adulthood that led her to writing; and Learning to Talk: Short Stories (2003).

            Hilary Mantel's novel Beyond Black (2005) tells the story of Alison, a Home Counties psychic, and her assistant, Colette. It was shortlisted for a 2006 Commonwealth Writers Prize and for the 2006 Orange Prize for Fiction. Her latest novel Wolf Hall (2009) won the 2009 Man Booker Prize for Fiction.

            Visit Hilary Mantel's Booktopia Author Page


            ISBN: 9780007353583
            ISBN-10: 0007353588
            Series: John MacRae Books
            Audience: General
            Format: Paperback
            Language: English
            Number Of Pages: 432
            Published: 10th May 2012
            Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
            Dimensions (cm): 23.3 x 14.4  x 3.3
            Weight (kg): 0.5