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A Rose for the Anzac Boys - Jackie French

Paperback

Published: April 2008
For Ages: 13+ years old
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Published: 1st April 2010
For Ages: 12+ years old
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The 'War to end all Wars', as seen through the eyes of three young women

It is 1915. War is being fought on a horrific scale in the trenches of France, but it might as well be a world away from sixteen-year-old New Zealander Midge Macpherson, at school in England learning to be a young lady. But the war is coming closer: Midge's brothers are in the army, and her twin, Tim, is listed as 'missing' in the devastating defeat of the Anzac forces at Gallipoli .

Desperate to do their bit - and avoid the boredom of school and the restrictions of Society - Midge and her friends Ethel and Anne start a canteen in France, caring for the endless flow of wounded soldiers returning from the front. Midge, recruited by the over-stretched ambulance service, is thrust into carnage and scenes of courage she could never have imagined. And when the war is over, all three girls - and their Anzac boys as well - discover that even going 'home' can be both strange and wonderful.

Exhaustively researched but written with the lightest of touches, this is Jackie French at her very best.

Ages 12+

About the Author

Jackie French is a full-time writer who lives near Braidwood in the Araluen Valley, NSW. In 2000, Hitler’s Daughter was awarded the CBC Younger Readers’ Award. To the Moon and Back won the Eve Pownall Award in 2005. Macbeth and Son, and Josephine Wants to Dance were both shortlisted for the 2007 CBC Awards.

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
A Rose for the Anzac Boys
 
5.0

(based on 4 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (4)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (0)

100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Deserves multiple readings (4)
  • Inspirational (4)
  • Well written (4)
  • Easy to understand (3)
  • Informative (3)

Cons

No Cons

Best Uses

  • Gift (4)
  • Older readers (3)
  • Younger readers (3)

Reviewed by 4 customers

Displaying reviews 1-4

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5.0

realities of war

By 

from Country NSW

About Me Bookworm

Pros

  • Deserves Multiple Readings
  • Easy To Understand
  • Informative
  • Inspirational
  • Relevant
  • Well Written

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Gift
    • Older Readers
    • Special Needs
    • Travel Reading
    • Younger Readers

    Comments about A Rose for the Anzac Boys:

    In A Rose for the Anzac Boys Jackie French vividly depicts the horror and heartbreak of battle at the Western Front during WWI. While not glorifying the violence, she doesn't compromise at all with the gruesome truth of it.

    The story concentrates on Margery (Midge) MacPherson and her experiences in France, serving tired and wounded troops near the front lines.

    When war starts, Midge is away from her New Zealand home and lives at a school for girls in England. She and her English school friends decide to leave school so they can play their part in the war effort by setting up a canteen for the troops in France, not realising how much their lives will be changed.

    Partly told in the form of letters, the realities of war are made clear, as Midge corresponds with family and friends at home and at the battle front. I found the letters to be a powerful and convincing part of the book, fitting in naturally with the ongoing narrative of Midge's story. They had an authenticity comparable to the real letters and diary entries I've read before and were some of the more moving portions of the books.

    While the book is set behind the lines, some of the letters from soldiers give us a glimpse of life and death at the front, while Midge's experiences take us into the world of the many volunteers who worked as caterers, ambulance drivers, VADs and nurses. We see that few were left unaffected by the cost of the war and that the effects continue through following generations.

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    5.0

    A rose for the anzac boys

    By 

    from Bundaberg, AU

    About Me Everyday Reader

    Pros

    • Deserves Multiple Readings
    • Easy To Understand
    • Informative
    • Inspirational
    • Relevant
    • Well Written

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Gift
      • Reference

      Comments about A Rose for the Anzac Boys:

      Awesome book for any ages over 13.
      Really easy to understand and very informative but a great story too.

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      5.0

      A easy read that's hard to put down

      By 

      from Canberra

      About Me Bookworm

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Deserves Multiple Readings
      • Easy To Understand
      • Informative
      • Inspirational
      • Relevant
      • Well Written

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Gift
        • Older Readers
        • Younger Readers

        Comments about A Rose for the Anzac Boys:

        This book was delivered promptly, I would recommend Booktopia.

        Comment on this reviewHelp Icon

         
        5.0

        A Rose for the ANZAC Boys

        By 

        from Brisbane

        About Me Casual Reader

        Verified Buyer

        Pros

        • Deserves Multiple Readings
        • Inspirational
        • Well Written

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Gift
          • Older Readers
          • Younger Readers

          Comments about A Rose for the Anzac Boys:

          This book maybe marketed at younger readers but this book anyone can enjoy. It is very well written and opens the readers eyes to some of the untold stories of World War 1. The stories of the women that were overseas helping out anyway possible. Excellent book.

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          Jackie French

          Jackie was the Australian Children's Laureate for 2014/15 and the 2015 Senior Australian of the Year.  She is also an historian, ecologist, dyslexic, and a passionate worker for literacy, the right of all children to be able to read, and the power of books.

          Jackie's writing career spans 25 years, 148 wombats, over 140 books, 36 languages, 3,721 bush rats, and over 60 awards in Australia and overseas. 

          Her books range from provocative historical fiction such as Hitler’s Daughter and They Came on Viking Ships to the hilarious international bestseller, Diary of a Wombat with Bruce Whatley, as well as many nonfiction titles such as The Fascinating History of Your Lunch, and To the Moon and Back (with Bryan Sullivan), the history of Australia’s Honeysuckle Creek and man’s journey to the moon.

          In 2000, Hitler’s Daughter was awarded the CBC Younger Readers’ Award. To the Moon and Back won the Eve Pownall Award in 2005. Macbeth and Son, and Josephine Wants to Dance were both shortlisted for the 2007 CBC Awards.

          Visit Jackie French 's Booktopia Author Page


          ISBN: 9780732285401
          ISBN-10: 0732285402
          Audience: Children
          For Ages: 13+ years old
          For Grades: 7 - 9
          Format: Paperback
          Language: English
          Number Of Pages: 304
          Published: April 2008
          Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers (Australia) Pty Ltd
          Country of Publication: AU
          Dimensions (cm): 19.8 x 12.8  x 1.9
          Weight (kg): 0.21