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A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man : Wordsworth Classics - James Joyce

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Wordsworth Classics

By: James Joyce, Jacqueline Belanger (Introduction by), Dr. Keith Carabine (Editor)

Paperback

Published: 5th May 1992
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A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man portrays Stephen's Dublin childhood and youth and, in doing so, provides an oblique self-portrait of the young James Joyce.

At its centre are questions of origin and source, authority and authorship, and the relationship of an artist to his family, culture, and race.

Exuberantly inventive in its style, the novel subtly and beautifully orchestrates the patterns of quotation and repetition instrumental in its hero's quest to create his own character, his own language, life, and art: to forge in the smithy of my soul the uncreated conscience of my race.

About the Author

James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 - 13 January 1941) was an Irish writer and poet, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. Along with Marcel Proust, Virginia Wolf, and William Faulkner, Joyce is a key figure in the development of the modernist novel. He is best known for his landmark novel Ulysses (1922). Other major works are the short-story collection Dubliners (1914), and the novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916) and Finnegans Wake (1939).

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man: The Complete Text
Biographical and Historical Contexts
The Complete Text
Cultural Documents and Illustrations
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism
Psychoanalytic Criticism
Feminist Criticism
Cultural Criticism
Postcolonial Studies
Combining Perspective0073
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.
James Joyce

James Joyce (1882-1941), Irish novelist, noted for his experimental use of language in such works as Ulysses (1922) and Finnegans Wake (1939). Joyce's technical innovations in the art of the novel include an extensive use of interior monologue; he used a complex network of symbolic parallels drawn from the mythology, history, and literature, and created a unique language of invented words, puns, and allusions.

James Joyce was born in Dublin, on February 2, 1882, as the son of John Stanislaus Joyce, an impoverished gentleman, who had failed in a distillery business and tried all kinds of professions, including politics and tax collecting. Joyce's mother, Mary Jane Murray, was ten years younger than her husband. She was an accomplished pianist, whose life was dominated by the Roman Catholic Church. In spite of their poverty, the family struggled to maintain a solid middle-class facade.

From the age of six Joyce, was educated by Jesuits at Clongowes Wood College, at Clane, and then at Belvedere College in Dublin (1893-97). In 1898 he entered the University College, Dublin. Joyce's first publication was an essay on Ibsen's play When We Dead Awaken. It appeared in the Fortnightly Review in 1900. At this time he also began writing lyric poems.

After graduation in 1902 the twenty-year-old Joyce went to Paris, where he worked as a journalist, teacher and in other occupations under difficult financial conditions. He spent a year in France, returning when a telegram arrived saying his mother was dying. Not long after her death, Joyce was traveling again. He left Dublin in 1904 with Nora Barnacle, a chambermaid who he married in 1931.

Joyce published Dubliners in 1914, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man in 1916, a play Exilesin 1918 and Ulysses in 1922. In 1907 Joyce had published a collection of poems, Chamber Music.

At the outset of the First World War, Joyce moved with his family to Zürich. In Zürich Joyce started to develop the early chapters of Ulysses, which was first published in France because of censorship troubles in the Great Britain and the United States, where the book became legally available only in 1933. In March 1923 Joyce started in Paris his second major work, Finnegans Wake, suffering at the same time chronic eye troubles caused by glaucoma. The first segment of the novel appeared in Ford Madox Ford's transatlantic review in April 1924, as part of what Joyce called Work in Progress. The final version was published in 1939.

Some critics considered the work a masterpiece, though many readers found it incomprehensible. After the fall of France in WWII, Joyce returned to Zürich, where he died on January 13, 1941, still disappointed with the reception of Finnegans Wake.

Visit James Joyce's Booktopia Author Page


ISBN: 9781853260063
ISBN-10: 1853260061
Series: Wordsworth Classics
Audience: General
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 238
Published: 5th May 1992
Dimensions (cm): 19.8 x 12.9  x 1.4
Weight (kg): 0.173