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A Moveable Feast - Ernest Hemingway

Paperback

Published: October 2000
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Hemingway's memories of his life as an unknown writer living in Paris in the twenties are deeply personal, warmly affectionate and full of wit. Looking back not only at his own much younger self, but also at the other writers who shared Paris with him - James Joyce, Wyndham Lewis, Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald - he recalls the time when, poor, happy and writing in cafes, he discovered his vocation. Written during the last years of Hemingway's life, his memoir is a lively and powerful reflection of his genius that scintillates with the romance of the city.

About the Author

Ernest Hemingway was born in 1899. His father was a doctor and he was the second of six children. Their home was at Oak Park, a Chicago suburb.

In 1917, Hemingway joined the Kansas City Star as a cub reporter. The following year, he volunteered as an ambulance driver on the Italian front, where he was badly wounded but decorated for his services. He returned to America in 1919, and married in 1921. In 1922, he reported on the Greco-Turkish war before resigning from journalism to devote himself to fiction. He settled in Paris where he renewed his earlier friendships with such fellow-American expatriates as Ezra Pound and Gertrude Stein. Their encouragement and criticism were to play a valuable part in the formation of his style.

Hemingway's first two published works were Three Stories and Ten Poems and In Our Time but it was the satirical novel, The Torrents of Spring, that established his name more widely. His international reputation was firmly secured by his next three books; Fiesta, Men Without Women and A Farewell To Arms.

He was passionately involved with bullfighting, big-game hunting and deep-sea fishing and his writing reflected this. He visited Spain during the Civil War and described his experiences in the bestseller, For Whom The Bell Tolls.

His direct and deceptively simple style of writing spawned generations of imitators but no equals. Recognition of his position in contemporary literature came in 1954 when he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, following the publication of The Old Man and the Sea. He died in 1961.

Published posthumously, this account of Hemingway's early years as a struggling writer in Paris in the 1920s may well have undergone further revision had Hemingway not taken his own life. Yet it was the best and most heartfelt work he had done for years, a return to the form of the early stories and the first novels. It tells the story of the sweet innocence of his first years in the Rue Moufftard with his wife, the literary friendships, the cafes and the delight which he enjoyed: both in the city and in discovering his own voice. Anyone who loves Paris will enjoy it and anyone who has affection or respect for Hemingway's work will find it deeply moving. (Kirkus UK)

Preface
Note
A Good Café on the Place St.-Michel
Miss Stein Instructs
"Une Génération Perdue"
Shakespeare and Company
People of the Seine
A False Spring
The End of an Avocation
Hunger Was Good Discipline
Ford Madox Ford and the Devil's Disciple
Birth of a New School
With Pascin at the Dôme
Ezra Pound and His Bel Esprit
A Strange Enough Ending
The Man Who Was Marked for Death
Evan Shipman at the Lilas
An Agent of Evil
Scott Fitzgerald
Hawks Do Not Share
A Matter of Measurements
There Is Never Any End to Paris
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

ISBN: 9780099285045
ISBN-10: 0099285045
Series: Vintage Classics
Audience: General
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 192
Published: October 2000
Dimensions (cm): 20.0 x 13.1  x 1.3
Weight (kg): 0.15