1300 187 187
 
A Clergyman's Daughter  - George Orwell

A Clergyman's Daughter

Paperback

Published: October 2000
In Stock. Usually ships in 1-2 business days
RRP $22.95
$17.25
25%
OFF

Dorothy, the heroine of this novel, performs good works, cultivates good thoughts, and pricks her arm with a pin when a bad thought arises. She then has a series of unexpected and degrading adventures after becoming a victim of amnesia. Though she regains her life as a clergyman' s daughter, she has lost her faith.

Orwell follows diverse tracks. Those who liked the stark realism and human drama of Down and Out in Paris and London will find this out of drawing and disappointing. Those who liked the color and pattern of Burmese Days will be equally disappointed. Frankly. I found The Clergyman's Daughter an unconvincing and unpleasant book. The story of a girl in the groove of a village parson's daughter's life; who escaped into sordidness and disillusionment through amnesia, and who slipped back once she was rescued from the mess of the life she had made for herself on the outside. Pass it up. (Kirkus Reviews)

George Orwell

Eric Arthur Blair (George Orwell) was born in 1903 in India, where his father worked for the Civil Service. The family moved to England in 1907 and in 1917 Orwell entered Eton, where he contributed regularly to the various college magazines. From 1922 to 1927 he served with the Indian Imperial Police in Burma, an experience that inspired his first novel Burmese Days (1934). Several years of poverty followed. He lived in Paris for two years before returning to England, where he worked successively as a private tutor, schoolteacher and bookshop assistant, and contributed reviews and articles to a number of periodicals. Down and Out in Paris and London was published in 1933. In 1936 he was commissioned by Victor Gollancz to visit areas of mass unemployment in Lancashire and Yorkshire, and The Road to Wigan Pier (1937) is a powerful description of the poverty he saw there. At the end of 1936 Orwell went to Spain to fight for the Republicans and was wounded. Homage to Catalonia is his account of the civil war. He was admitted to a sanatorium in 1938 and from then on was never fully fit. He spent six months in Morocco and there wrote Coming Up for Air. During the Second World War he served in the Home Guard and worked for the BBC Eastern Service from 1941 to 1943. As literary editor of Tribune he contributed a regular page of political and literary commentary, and he also wrote for the Observer and later for the Manchester Evening News. His unique political allegory, Animal Farm, was published in 1945, and it was this novel, together with Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949), which brought him world-wide fame. George Orwell died in London in January 1950. A few days before, Desmond MacCarthy had sent him a message of greeting in which he wrote: 'You have made an indelible mark on English literature . . . you are among the few memorable writers of your generation.'

Visit George Orwell's Booktopia Author Page


ISBN: 9780141184654
ISBN-10: 0141184655
Series: Penguin Classics Ser.
Audience: General
Format: Paperback
Language: English
Number Of Pages: 320
Published: October 2000
Dimensions (cm): 19.5 x 10.6  x 2.9
Weight (kg): 0.23
Edition Number: 1